thegraywolff

A brief gallivant about the marketplace of ideas.

Month: June, 2019

Read : 2019-06-30

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. Why rich kids are so good at the marshmallow test“, by Jessica McCrory Calarco (The Atlantic, 2018-06-01). The focal study by Watts et al. can be accessed here.
  2. Want to be less racist? Move to Hawaii“, by Moises Valsquez-Manoff (NY Times, 2019-06-28).
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Read : 2019-06-29

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. Jane Austen’s tips for ‘health and happiness’“, by Bryan Kozlowksi (History Extra, 2019-06-25). Besides marry well, and marry rich. Joking aside, intriguing article.

Read : 2019-06-28

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. Why you need to watch the USWNT vs. France“, by Jason Gay (Wall Street Journal, 2019-06-27).
  2. The soccer team built to beat the U.S.“, by Joshua Robinson (Wall Street Journal, 2019-06-26). That would be France, the USA’s opponent in today’s quarterfinal’s match.
  3. Supreme Court declines to set limits on political gerrymandering“, by Jess Bravin & Brent Kendall (Wall Street Journal, 2019-06-27).
  4. The Democrats’ small-band debate is a recipe for failure against Trump“, by Lauren Claffey (OZY, 2019-06-27). A warning to politicians treating voters like…well, like Facebook treats its users, “lumping and re-lumping…voters into neat groups that are served a specific message, tailored for their interests…”
  5. Cryptocurrency winners are starting to emerge“, by Aaron Brown (Bloomberg, 2019-06-07). The article cites ADA, DASH, ETH, LTC, TRX as coins that “failed to maintain their values in terms of Bitcoin at the market low in December 2018”; MIOTA, NEO, XLM, XMR, XRP as coins that “have not maintained their Bitcoin capitalization in the 2019 rally”. The author is positive on “five currencies…that took full advantage of the rally in December 2017, maintained good value even at the lows in December 2018, and have rebounded sharply”: BAT, BNB, BTC, EOS, FRC; and on certain “coins introduced…after the peak”: BSV, CRO, DAI and MKR, ONT, XTZ. The author ends warning that cryptocurrency investments are “high risk” and says he invests 2% of his portfolio in diverse cryptocurrency holdings (for what it’s worth).
  6. Goodbye, object oriented programming“, by Charles Scalfani (Medium, 2016-07-23).

Read : 2019-06-26

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. Huawei telecom gear much more vulnerable to hackers than rivals’ equipment, report says“, by Kate O’Keeffe & Dustin Volz (Wall Street Journal, 2019-06-25). In a report, US-based cybersecurity firm Finite State analyzes “more than 1.5 million files embedded within 9,936 firmware images supporting 558 different products” made by Huawei. Finite State also compares the security of the Huawei CE12800 network switch to two others (Arista 7280R and Juniper EX4650) (pp 39 – 41).
  2. When gravity breaks down“, by Sabine Hossenfelder (Nautilus, 2019-02-15).
  3. Republicans don’t understand democrats — and democrats don’t understand republicans“, by Yascha Mounk (The Atlantic, 2019-06-23). A summary of findings from “The perception gap” study, run by More in Common. The study blames “negative partisanship” on misunderstanding (and misrepresentation) of the beliefs of opposing political parties. Media exposure is positively correlated to this misunderstanding, as is (shockingly) education, for democrats. “[Democrats] with a postgrad degree have a way more skewed view of Republicans than anybody else.” The article concludes that the situation is “deeply worrying” and “downright disturbing”. But is it unexpected? Isn’t convincing the electorate that there are only two viable options (a false dilemma), and that the alternative is evil incarnate, an effective way to secure votes and cling to power? Should big media be held accountable for creating and promoting this poisonous political atmosphere, in the way that some are clamoring for big tech to be held accountable for purported abuse of their power?

Read : 2019-06-24

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. Facts don’t change people’s minds. Here’s what does“, by Ozan Varol (Heleo, 2017-09-08). Clever approach taking psychology into account: Your past beliefs weren’t wrong, they were based on your knowledge then; when your knowledge updates, then reevaluate your beliefs. Is all belief “constructed”? Another important fact to remember: You are distinct from your beliefs. Aren’t beliefs an important component of your self-identity? Or is our concept of self-identity amiss?

Read : 2019-06-23

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. Time blocking: Improve your focus and get more meaningful work done“, by Darius Foroux (Darius Foroux, 2017-09-25). Deliberately schedule time on your calendar for your top priorities.
  2. Apple’s top leaders use this simple presentation hack to make their slides more memorable“, by Carmine Gallo (Inc, 2019-06-21). One number, and minimal words, per slide.

Read : 2019-06-22

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. ‘Most of government is unconstitutional’“, by Nicholas Bagley (NY Times, 2019-06-22). Bagley worries the Supreme Court’s conservative justices may attack and constrain Congress’s power to delegate, as evidenced by dissenting opinions in Gundy v. United States.

Read : 2019-06-21

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. Millennials, you’ve got this all wrong. You need to stop ‘saving’ for retirement.“, by Erin Lowry (USA Today, 2019-06-20). Saving versus investing, and the power of compounded interest (you remember, those word problems from high school math class?). Also, the importance of financial literacy. If people in government want to mandate things, why don’t they mandate that basic financial skills be taught in public school? Oh, good point — that might upend the existing balance of wealth and power. Well, spread what you know, and always exercise your own due diligence.
  2. How to create ‘sixteen candles’ for queer teens“, by Fiona Zublin (OZY, 2019-06-21). I appreciate stories and people that demonstrate (if implicitly, even better) that an aspect of who we are doesn’t have to define who we are. An unusual thought in today’s social and political climate? Within Mariko Tamaki‘s work, writer and critic Terry Hong highlights “This one summer” and “Skim“.

Read : 2019-06-20

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. The monopolies of the future will be Chinese — and state-owned“, by Ben Halder (OZY, 2019-06-17). My take-aways: China is home to several State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs). These SOEs are large and growing larger fast. (Then again, China is large, so are we surprised that eventually Chinese companies will outnumber American ones in the Fortune 500?) The article alleges that SOEs “benefit from favorable legislation and regulation” — not surprising, given the ownership, but examples would be nice.
  2. The Trilemma“, by Marina N. Bolotnikova (Harard Magazine, 2019-07/08). A long, well written survey of economist Dani Rodrik’s work.
  3. Zip code vs. genetic code“, by Erin O’Donnell (Harvard Magazine, 2019-07/08). A short case study of how to mine data.
  4. Facebook unveils cryptocurrency libra in bid to reshape finance“, by Jeff Horwitz & Parmy Olson (Wall Street Journal, 2019-06-18).
  5. Libra coin? What you need to know about Facebook’s answer to bitcoin“, by Parmy Olson (Wall Street Journal, 2019-06-18). A concise FAQ for Facebook’s libra. At least, what (little) is now known.
  6. The speed freak who transformed running“, by Katie Arnold (NY Times, 2019-06-14). A book review of “Running to the edge”, by NY Times deputy sports manager Matthew Futterman. Love the quote: “They are chasing victory, but also the primal idea of doing what the body was meant to do, doing it beautifully and to its fullest extent, which are really the same thing.”
  7. Why Americans are so skeptical of impeachment“, by James C. Cobb (Zocalo, 2019-06-19). Blame Andrew Johnson, and the convenience of viewing everything in politics as being primarily politically motivated.
  8. U.N. investigator calls for probe of Saudi officials in Khashoggi killing“, by Carol Morello & Kareem Fahim (Washington Post, 2019-06-19). Call of the obvious, or, when politics trumps humanity.

Read : 2019-06-18

Today’s selection of articles:

  1. GDPR has been a boon for Google and Facebook“, by Nick Kostov & Sam Schechner (Wall Street Journal, 2019-06-17). Advertisers’ concern over compliance has led them to advertise with Facebook and Google.
  2. What a Facebook breakup would mean for investors“, by Brian Sozzi (Yahoo Finance, 2019-06-17). The article never really says what breakup would mean, but punts to a special series on Yahoo Finance called “The BreakUp”. The most informative part of the article may be the warning of Goldman Sachs strategist David Kostin that closes the article.