thegraywolff

A brief gallivant about the marketplace of ideas.

Month: November, 2014

Read — 2014/11/25

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. Our cats, ourselves“, by Razib Khan (NY Times). Genomic studies illuminate the evolutionary history of domesticated cats — and humans.
  2. Johnson, Martinez and Smoltz lead ballot“, by the A.P. (NY Times). Major League Baseball’s 2015 Hall-of-Fame ballot.
  3. Far from perfect, Harvard ends impeccably against Yale“, by Peter May (NY Times). 31-24.
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Read — 2014/11/22

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. Can David still sue Goliath“, by Michael Zuckerman (The Atlantic). The economics, politics, and technology behind class-action law suits.
  2. The end of yoga (as you know it)“, by Brenda Strohmaier (OZY). Is “dogma-free” yoga still yoga?

Read — 2014/11/21

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. Obama, daring Congress, acts to overhaul immigration“, by Micheal D. Shear (NY Times).
  2. The U.S. government thinks China could take down the power grid“, by Jamie Crawford (CNN).
  3. The secret life of passwords“, by Ian Urbina (NY Times). An intriguing if perambulatory article, with references to tchotchke and the Stonewall riots.
  4. When three into one equals more“, by Holland Cotter (NY Times). Harvard University reopens the combined Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Sackler art museums — the “Harvard Art Museums”. (You’d think that delaying the reopening three years would have given plenty of time to come up with a more inventive name.)

Read — 2014/11/19

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. North Korea: UN moves closer to ICC human rights probe” (BBC News). A motion seeking a probe passed the human rights committee 111 in favor, 19 against, 55 abstaining. China is expected to block referral to the ICC.
  2. How medical care is being corrupted“, by Pamela Hartzband & Jerome Groopman (NY Times). The hidden incentive structure influencing your physician’s advice.
  3. My three sons and all their troubles“, by Charles Isherwood (NY Times). A warm reception for Ms. Young Jean Lee‘s newest play, “Straight White Men”, playing now at the Public Theater.

Read — 2014/11/18

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. Five takeaways on Japan’s GDP numbers“, by Mitsuru Obe (Wall Street Journal).
  2. The calorie burn before the feast“, by Rachel Bachman (Wall Street Journal).
  3. Japan PM Shinzo Abe calls snap election in December“, by Rupert Wingfield-Hayes (BBC). Part mandate-seeking, part power-grab.
  4. The race to save the world’s chocolate“, by Megan Garber (The Atlantic). Chocolate analysts predict that the chocolate shortage could increase 14-fold by 2020. Methods of stemming the shortage include decreasing the size of chocolate treats, adding nonchocolate filler (e.g., nuts, nougat, etc.), and nurturing strains of more-productive cacao.
  5. Got milk? Might not be doing you much good“, by Aaron E. Carroll (NY Times). “More and more [scientific] evidence is surfacing…that milk consumption may not only be unhelpful, it might also be detrimental.”

Read — 2014/11/17

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. Secret U.S. cellphone program” (Wall Street Journal).
  2. The Web is dying; apps are killing it“, by Christopher Mims (Wall Street Journal). Time on apps is detracting from time on the Internet, and their proprietary platforms are detracting from innovation.
  3. Defying expectations, Japan’s economy falls into recession“, by Jonathan Soble (NY Times). Axing a proposed tax hike, enacting further stimulus measures, and calling a Parliamentary election may follow.

Read — 2014/11/13

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. US and China leaders in ‘historic’ greenhouse gas emissions pledge“, by Carrie Gracie (BBC). During a state visit to Beijing, the US agrees to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at least 26% by 2025; in return, China states that “emissions would peak by 2030”.
  2. At APEC, Obama, Putin find themselves in awkward moments“, by Josh Chin (Wall Street Journal). No one is immune, it seems. Kudos to the artist(s) of this parody.
  3. Why are so many workers still part time? Seven charts“, by Nick Timiraos (Wall Street Journal). Record-low unemployment figures mask the fact that many workers are involuntarily part-time.

Read — 2014/11/11

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. A gruesome mass murder“, by H.T. (The Economist). Three detainees claim that the 43 student teachers were “handed over by municipal police to a gang of drug traffickers”.
  2. Catalonia vote: 80% back independence” (BBC).
  3. Sex will soon be just for fun not babies, says father of the pill“, by Sarah Knapton (The Telegraph). The latest sex talk, with Dr. Carl Djerassi.
  4. Social media breakup etiquette: how to handle past relationships on Facebook and Instagram“, by Patricia Garcia (Vogue). To delete or not to delete, that is the question.

Read — 2014/11/05

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. A bigger bazooka“, by T.B. (The Economist).
  2. Suntory time: Japanese whisky named world’s best in sour dram for Scotland“, by Justin McCurry (The Guardian). Japanese Suntory Yamazaki Single Malt Sherry Cask 2013 takes first prize in the 2015 World Whisky Bible.
  3. Elsa dominates Anna in `Frozen’ merchandise sales“, by Ellen Byron & Paul Ziobro (Wall Street Journal). Sibling rivalry, with total ordering by revenue.

Read — 2014/11/05

Today’s selection of articles includes:

  1. Kenya’s Kipsang, Keitany win NYC Marathon crowns“, by Larry Fine (Reuters).
  2. The 26-year-old face of the French right“, by Laura Secorun Palet (OZY).